On May 2, 2016, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie conditionally vetoed Senate Bill 992 (“S. 992”), which was intended to amend the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“NJ LAD”) to make wage disparities among similarly situated employees expressly unlawful. While S. 992 is aimed at reducing gendered or race-based pay disparity, Governor Christie stated that the bill would make New Jersey “very business unfriendly,” and criticized several aspects, including:

  1. Restarting the statute of limitations each time an employee receives unequal pay, and allowing for back pay for the entire period of continuous violation, which is currently capped at two years and is identical to the federal Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009;
  2. Prohibiting employers from requiring employees to waive or voluntarily limit their equal pay protections;
  3. Allowing treble damages upon any employer found to be in violation;
  4. Protecting employees from retaliation if they disclose their salary to a co-worker; and
  5. Shifting responsibility and burden of proof to the employer to justify pay differences, which would be permitted only based on seniority, merit, or objective factors such as training, experience, education, and productivity.

Additionally, S. 992 is substantially similar to the California Fair Pay Act, which was adopted last year. Governor Christie has made several recommendations, with which he would revoke his veto and sign a revised version of S. 992. Some of these recommendations include eliminating fact-based evaluation in alleged discrimination cases as well as treble damages. Governor Christie also would like the revised version to limit back pay to two years, as opposed to the proposed unlimited amount. While S. 992 passed the State Senate by a vote of 28 to 4, and the General Assembly by a vote of 54 to 14 to 6, it is unclear whether the legislature will attempt to override Governor Christie’s veto, which requires a two-thirds margin.

Employers should be mindful of the status of this bill, along with others like it, as there will be far-reaching consequences should one be successful in being signed into law. Hill Wallack employment law attorneys are available to help navigate issues such as these and how they may affect clients in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.