NFL Cheerleaders file FLSA Claims

Posted by on Feb 17, 2014 in FLSA

By Felicity S. Hanks, Esq. (fhanks@hillwallack.com)

NFL cheerleaders have recently filed two lawsuits against their NFL football team employers, alleging that the football teams failed to compensate them for actual hours worked and provided wages that were grossly below the minimum wage requirement.  The Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) obligates covered employers to pay their employees a wage equal to at least $7.25.  FLSA further requires employers to pay employees for each hour that they work.  State laws provide equal, if not more stringent, wage and hour requirements.  The U.S. Department of Labor and state labor departments are responsible for investigating and enforcing wage and hour laws, but individuals maintain the right to bring direct legal actions against their employers for violations of the laws.

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TORRES v. GRISTEDE'S OPERATING CORP. –

Posted by on Oct 22, 2012 in FLSA

By: Susan L. Swatski, Esq. (email / link to bio)

On October 12, 2012, nine legal and workers’ rights organizations urged the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to label John Catsimatidis, the owner and CEO of New York City grocery chain Gristedes Foods Inc., an “employer” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) which would make him personally, jointly and severally liable for a $3.5 million overtime class action settlement.

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TORRES v. GRISTEDE’S OPERATING CORP. –

Posted by on Oct 22, 2012 in FLSA

By: Susan L. Swatski, Esq. (email / link to bio)

On October 12, 2012, nine legal and workers’ rights organizations urged the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to label John Catsimatidis, the owner and CEO of New York City grocery chain Gristedes Foods Inc., an “employer” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) which would make him personally, jointly and severally liable for a $3.5 million overtime class action settlement.

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The Third Circuit Clarifies the Test to Determine “Joint Employer” Liability Under the FLSA

Posted by on Aug 16, 2012 in FLSA

by Rashmee Sinha, Esquire (email / link to bio)

Quite often, Plaintiffs in collective actions brought under the Fair Labor Standard Act, (“FLSA”)(29 U.S.C. 201, et seq.) seek certification of as broad a class as possible in order to obtain a large and lucrative settlement against their employer(s). One way to broaden the class size is to include employees of the employer’s sister companies in the class under the theory that the sister companies’ parent company qualifies as the plaintiffs’ “joint employer.”

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